New Beer’s Eve – The Day Before National Beer Day.

April 7th is the anniversary of the day legislation, the Cullen-Harrison Act, allowed alcohol to be legally sold again in the United States.  Later that year, the twenty-first amendment was ratified and Prohibition repealed.  April 7 has become known as National Beer Day (because we know that beer is the most important of the Alcohols).  Therefore, the day prior, April 6th, is affectionately known as New Beer’s Eve.  That’s today.  Since beer is the focus of National Beer Day let it be the drink over which you meditate.

Alcohol is certainly abused and this has contributed to tragedy – household penury, domestic violence, major health problems, fatalities.  Concern over these abuses contributed to the zealotry of the temperance movements in the early 1900’s and to Prohibition.  Banning a substance, however, does not necessarily excise the problems since the actual underlying causal problem remains.  In fact, such action can lead to other serious problems or makes the object of the ban more tempting and therefore actually promotes what is trying to be stopped.  Prohibition resulted in increased illegal consumption of alcohol, organized crime, feelings of discrimination toward ethnic groups, and reduced tax income for government and other social and legal concerns.

Individual moral stands are products of the context of a person’s life and personality architecture.  They can drive a person to live an honest and rewarding life.  When people become moralists, attempting to enforce their personal code and strictures on those around you, problems seem to arise.  There can be discussions, dialogue with friends, and even family, about your codes; talk, express, listen.  In the end, though, each person has to make their own decisions about things.

Granted, the code we live by should not incur harm to those around us.  The issues noted above which stalk the culture of alcohol do harm.  Those actions need to be addressed, considered, curtailed.  Banning alcohol, unfortunately, did not stop any of that, nor did it cure alcoholism.  If it had, well, it would have been worth the experiment.  But those are, for now, a perennial problem, faced by generation after generation.  Take a moment to examine your own proclivities.  If you, or family and friends, note an imbalance take whatever action is necessary to slay that particular dragon.

Personally, I think the loss of tax revenue was the biggest driver for repeal of Prohibition.  It seems that the best way to make your voice heard in this country is to speak with your Money.  Mammon is alive and well and influential.  Taxation of liquor is a source of irritation for brewers and bar owners.  It can be a big hurdle for new owners.

 

There are more breweries in the US now than there were pre-Prohibition.  There are two to choose from in Kingman, Black Bridge and Rickety Cricket.  The brewers there will be happy to talk to you about their beers and their tax struggles.  It’s a nice spring day, maybe a little windy, just right for a K-Town Weiss over at Black Bridge.  There’s a couple of wheat’s on tap at Rickety Cricket as well.

Cheers as always.

 

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