Gender Roles and Brewing

One of the first axioms learned in home brewing is Charlie Papazian’s Proverb:  “Relax.  Don’t worry.  Have a home brew.”  Two weeks ago I heard that refrain on the Brewing Patio at Black Bridge.  A Belgian Blonde was being brewed by two women, Rachel & Sharon.  They were both questioning temperature as the beer was being transferred to the fermentation vessels.  They were told to ‘not worry so much.’  Their response was, ‘we’re women.  We worry.’

The declaration made me wonder: do women, in fact, worry more than men?  What is the objective of their worry compared to men?  Are they concerned about their reputations?  Or are they concerned about the well being of those they serve? Or is it pointless to even make that a thing because, we are all, you know, people?  After all, let’s not forget it was a man who penned the above warning regarding worry.  Many men have read that warning and have had to remind themselves of it during a stressful brewday.

Before you continue reading, I feel I must warn you – there are no answers to the above questions.  At least, not from me.  Go forth, then, and have a full discussion of gender roles.

Traditionally women have been entrusted with domestic management.  They have always been concerned about how and known the way to take care of their family.  An important part of family life is centered around food and drink.  Beer – or wine, or mead, or alcohol of choice – has always been a part of human life; from ancient times women were usually bread makers and beer brewers. It was a home activity. Once it became a profession or an industry men arrogated it.  More women are becoming involved in the commercial brewing industry now.  Women may especially worry about their performance in this industry and others because they are working in what has now become a man’s environment and they feel they must prove themselves.  Whose fault is that?

The point?  Humans have brewed.  Humans are brewing.  Maybe we should just leave it at that.  Gender politics should not be a thing.  Therefore, I have mixed feelings on whether I should write this up the way I am. But here I am doing it.  Fine.  I’ll throw this in – one difference I noted in the Belgian brewday was the number of selfies happening.  I have no idea how that fits into the gender role discussion.

As noted above the beer being brewed was Belgian Blonde with additions of prickly pear.  That’s right, No Pricks Allowed has returned.  While the female brewers of the beer were different than last year there have been no other stylistic to the beer.  From what I recall, it was a beautiful beverage – outstanding clarity and bright purple color.  It had a light body and drank quickly and easily.  It’s Belgian-ness was not overpowering, nor was the prickly pear.

Here we are in the post-modern information age and still arguing over race and gender.  I’m simply going to argue that No Pricks Allowed was a good beer last time around.   And If I recall correctly, last year’s iteration of this beer encouraged Janelle to begin her own home brewing adventures.

Politics, gender or otherwise, may be a verboten subject at the brewery (yeah, I’m pretty sure that’s not true) but beer and brewing is always on the table so check for this Belgian Blonde in the coming week.  Raise a glass to the people in your life.

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The B3 Brunch Redux

Black Bridge is hosting breakfast again. This time the brunch is catered by Sirens Cafe, a restaurant next door to our venerable nanobrewery. The menu is quite different from the previous offerings, but Carmella usually does good work so I was optimistic.   

We started with drinks: a beermosa made with Lil Orange Van, Oktoberfest and 66 Porter, and a Dr Pepper.  So, everybody – Lil Orange Van Beermosas. Fantastic!  You’re welcome, Kingman, for having that drink introduced to you.  Seriously, you want it. (Insert Jedi mind trick hand wave). 

Then we ordered breakfast; a ham & Swiss quiche; candied bacon avocado toast; chicken & waffles with bourbon syrup. Now, I’ll be totally honest here. Sometimes, I feel that Sirens does some, well, eclectic food. And I was a smidge concerned when I saw the menu for today.  However, I am now totally a believer. The food was great. I had the chicken and waffles. Both were light and ambrosial. Really, that lightness was key. It was not a greasy slab of chicken and overly breads waffle. They were balanced and slight on the palate and the syrup was not overpowered with bourbon. The hint was there and that was sufficient. 

So, I won’t say it was superior to Tim’s fare last year -his candied bacon and pozole was just superb – but the food today was sapid, toothsome, yummy. I was very happy.  

Granted, I’m no foodie but this was a lot of fun and a good addition to the program for livening up the downtown area.  Cheers to Tim and Carmella!  I will look for the next opportunity to attend the Hipster Breakfast. Even if I’m beyond the “hipster” years. Whatever. 

Weekend Beer Recommendations

For October 6-8, 2017

Here are my recommendations for what you should be drinking.  You do what you want, of course.

Homebrew.  If you have it at home it should be your first choice.  Prime your weekend of beer with a brew of your own.  I have Shistory Saison.  It’s a very brown saison with a little pepper in the background as it warms.  This batch suffers from overcarbonation but that seems to be subsiding as it ages.  Still good.

Local Beer.  At Black Bridge, I’d recommend a couple of beers:  first, Oktoberfest.  I agree that this should be a year-round beer.  It’s a sunset-copper color, sweet & malty but not overly so.  Basically, this is a liquid metaphor of the change in seasons.  The other recommendation would be Li’l Orange Van, the orange vanilla weiss beer.  Yes, it’s a creamsicle in a glass; drink one of those as a shout out to summer, then Oktoberfest to say goodbye to summer.  All right, bonus recommendation – for you weirdo’s who like the pumpkiny stuff, Heckedy Peg will be arriving soon.  It’s fine, for a pumpkin beer.  If that’s your thing, well, super, I guess.  Just don’t talk to me about it.

 Other Commercial Beer.  Both options above may be unavailable to you, or maybe you eschew them and just want a beer from the shelf.  If so, drink a Sam Adams OctoberFest.

This weekend has supervenient beer events.  The 2017 Brews and Brats Oktoberfest will be held at Metcalfe Park.  Black Bridge will be providing the beer again.  In addition to the Oktoberfest noted above, a schwarzbier will be available and also Go To Helles, the brewery’s faux-lager yellow fizzy clone, which is terribly popular and really quite good.  And on Sunday, the Sunday Funday Breakfast will return to Black Bridge.

Containers and the Local

The city council meeting tonight, July 5, had one item on the agenda that could have deleterious effects on the craft brewing scene locally.  It was this:

  • Public hearing and consideration of Ordinance No. 1828 amending Subsection 26.820 of the Zoning Ordinance of City of Kingman to allow storage containers on properties in the C-2 zoning district and prescribing certain standards and limitations

    Subsection 26.820 SECURE STORAGE UNITS, CARGO, FREIGHT, OR OVERSEAS CONTAINERS of the Zoning Ordinance of the City of
    Kingman permits portable storage containers in the C-3, I-1 and I-2 zoning districts with certain conditions.   Containers are expressly prohibited in all residential districts and the Recreational Open Space “O” zoning district. On June 13, 2017, the Planning & Zoning Commission voted 6-0 to recommend approval of Ordinance No. 1828 as written. The City Manager believes that containers should be either allowed everywhere in C-2 and not separate out the Entertainment District.

This ordinance would mean that a business in the Entertainment District could not have containers.  There is one business only in that District which would be restricted by this ordinance and that is Black Bridge Brewery.  They have two containers on site.  The city council did recognize that this was directed towards the brewery and that compliance with the amendment as proposed would create a hardship for them.  There would be a lot of engineering and architectural costs involved.

It could have interrupted our supply of beer.  This is bad.  Bad!

However, the city council seemed to be mostly supportive of Black Bridge.  They proposed revising the ordinance to remove the restriction on containers in the “entertainment district” and would define the “repurposing” of containers; i.e., adding refrigeration and electrical power, etc., essentially means the containers are not for storage.   The council seemed to acknowledge that Black Bridge is not really using the containers for storage, rather it is for operational purposes.  This was stated at least twice in the meeting.  Additionally, having two 20′ containers would be considered equal to having a single 40′ container.   Changes that made actual sense.

The council mentioned that if the containers were already in place and permitted then none of this would apply.  The business could continue as is.  However, Blake Schritter explained that they have tried to get the required permits but have been repeatedly denied with no explanation.  The mayor and building officials are supposed to meet with the Schritters on Thursday, July 6 to sort out this matter.

Aesthetics came up several times in regard to the containers.  In other words, the containers make the neighborhood look bad.  That’s what I got from it.  Not sure if those who added that bit to the ordinance have really looked around Kingman much, but, you know, there are some places that are pretty trashy – without the containers.  In other words, lots of “aesthetic” work could be given to other areas in the town.  First.  A couple of people did speak and gave examples of other sheds and storage buildings in their neighborhoods (and at the Fairgrounds) that were permitted but were terribly unaesthetic.

So, basically, Black Bridge can continue to operate with the containers … if they are given permits.  Evidently, though, this matter of permits has come up before in council meetings and still nothing was done.  Let’s hope it gets completely resolved this time.  We will all need to drink extra beer to accommodate any permit costs.

Anyway, at least a partial victory for your local!  Containers stay.  Beer continues.  The city council seems to be supporting the brewery and that’s good news.

Cheers!

Sale of Lagunitas Brewing

Evidently, Lagunitas Brewing finally gave in and sold the rest of themselves to Heineken.  I will not discuss the merits or demerits of said sale, that is for you, the drinkers to decide.  I occasionally enjoyed Lagunitas beers, but they were never in the upper echelons of my “To Drink” list.  But the brewery has been around for a long time.  It’s name is, if not venerated, prestigious

Now we can continue the debate regarding the compromising of craft beer.  Are the big, older breweries simply following the American vision of growth and expansion?  Is this the “manifest destiny” of brewing?  Or are they following the money?  Is the sale to a global mega-corporation bad if the beers don’t change in character?  I have no idea what the answers truly are to those questions.  (But writing “global mega-corporation” gave me dystopian sci-fi conspiratorial goosebumps).

I did find a comment from Lagunitas owner, Tony Magee, unsettling.  He’s writing here regarding Lagunita’s sale of half the company in 2015 and the remainder of it this year.

“Some who don’t fully understand it all may say it is selling out.  Truth is that we did then, and are now ‘buying in.’