K-Town Weiss by Black Bridge Brewery

Unless winter decides it did not represent itself enough this year and decides to hang on and bully us until summer, our weather should start to think about spring soon.  Black Bridge’s recent tap-list addition can therefore be viewed as either a farewell to the cold season or a herald of springtime.  The beer is K-Town Weiss, which is pronounced “vice.”

It is a wheat beer of German descent.  The majority of the grist bill will consist of wheat malt, hops presence will be very low, imperceptible.   The ‘weiss’ indicates it’s a “white” beer which meant that this style was cloudy and hazy instead of having the clarity of a pilsener or strong golden ale.   This was due to the yeast still being suspended in the body of the beer.  Additionally, it indicates that a Bavarian weissbier yeast strain was used in production.  You likely have heard of these beers as hefeweizen – refreshing, light and happy beers, perfect for the desert.

That Smell …
All I could pick up was a yeasty, grainy aroma.  No hops present.  I did not get any clove, which is predominantly the nose of these beers.  So you may smell that, or even some bubblegum.

In Appearance …
It is, indeed, yellow. Not cloudy, I’d say, but nebular.  A bright, appealing nebula of orange juice. 

But the Taste …
Light and bubbly body. Banana has a moderate presence here. Maybe that adds to its Springiness, that slight allusion to a tropical ideal. Nice. So Germany, where this originated, really isn’t tropical. It’s fascinating that a yeast strain from there, which was used in this beer, would develop such flavor motif.  Anyway.  There’s a slight tartness to it, too. Like a Berliner Weisse, almost, but not as pronounced.  Dry finish. No hops perception, and I really didn’t catch any clove. Nor any effervescence.

Conclusions
The wheat beer well known at Black Bridge is Wicked Poison.  It’s a 14% monster.  In contrast, K-Town is a modest 4.7% abv, so it won’t clobber you.  It’s also good with sour cream & onion dip.  Make of that what you will.   Sit on your porch, watch spring happen.

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Beer and Brunch – the Sunday Funday

Sunday’s are an admixture of leisure and dread.  On Friday the weekend begins and heralds relief from the labors of the week. However, that same weekend can bring other work: domestic chores, hobbies, home and car maintenance – all the stuff that can’t be done during the week often schedule themselves for Friday and Saturday. When Sunday dawns, perhaps those chores are complete and leisure does unveil itself. But it is short lived for Monday is coming, like that freight train at the end of the tunnel. Leisure and dread, waltzing to cognitive disharmony.

Black Bridge has started to open its doors on Sunday’s and perhaps it can mollify that dreadful waltz.  Brewer and owner Tim Schritter takes over the Sirens Cafe kitchen and cooks brunch-worthy items: fried egg sandwiches, chorizo & egg burritos, pozole. It does not aspire to be haute cuisine but it is a satisfying menu that tastes homemade.

The fried egg sandwich was recommended and the recommendation was good. It is fried eggs and bacon on sourdough bread, toasted with smoked provolone cheese. Since the egg was requested over easy the sandwich was gloriously messy and tasty. Also consumed was the chorizo burrito notable for not being a greasy mess that inundated hands and plate.  The pozole had some tender pork and a decent salsa heat.  Mr Schritter is a good cook in addition to being a good brewer.

The homemade character of the Sunday Funday makes it an event worth attending. In addition to the food that will not disappoint is Black Bridge’s signature beermosas. Admittedly, this writer did not know to what the -mosa suffix referred.  A conference with a spouse and some quick internet research has revealed that a mimosa is a cocktail of champagne and orange juice.   Black Bridge substitutes their beer for the champagne and the substitution is good.  The orange juice is a toothsome complement to B3 Wheat.  Wicked Ginger is appropriate, too, but the ginger ale and the orange juice may be in some competition, although the ginger beermosa was much smoother on the palate.  The B3 Wheat beermosa presented more aggressive carbonation.  They were both very morningy.

Add to all the above the usual affable buzz and an NFC playoff game and it makes for a pleasant morning.  Sunday Funday occurs on every Sunday at Black Bridge Brewery from 10 am to 4 pm.  Cheers!

Weekend Beer Picks

Whereas the first six months of this year have passed fugaciously, this week has been interminable. Every day I have looked at the office clock, or the computer clock, or the iPhone clock and have become whelmed with anguish that only an hour has expired instead of the four I had felt. Once the work day is finally over, of course, and I get home and can relax two things happen. First, time pretends it’s the Milennium Falcon and jumps to lightspeed right away; second, I realize that I have a ton of things that need to be done at home and, oh, day’s over. This weekend, then, I need some beer that will soothe and brighten.

When I think of soothing beer, I always think of something dark and roasty; a beer that has substance but not one that demands palate analysis; an ale that will warm while you hold your glass and not lose character. For a beer that brightens I want the opposite – in appearance, at least. A yellow to amber jewel, with mild hop aroma and presence; something on the effervescent side, with character but, again, nothing demanding.

With those parameters and my interest currently piqued in the College Street Brewhouse my beer picks for this weekend are:

Sweet Devil Stout
This beer is the Guinness of Mohave County. It’s thick, creamy and has just the right amount of roast. Just thinking about this beer is making me happy. Smooth, sable, and really good with, or as, dessert.

Big Blue Van

I’m not always a fan of fruity beers, but CSB pulls it off and makes me like it with the Big Blue Van. It’s a wheat beer, which is my vote for the best style of beer for the desert, and it’s infused with blueberry and vanilla. Honestly, you can’t help but smile after drinking this beer.

You can find their beers at the Kwik Stop on Hualapai Mountain Road. Or you can take a trip to the brewery.

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Yes, It’s Called Witless

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I love Mothership Wit and Hoegaarden and, especially, a local brewery’s wit beer called Full Moon.
So I did my best to make a wit.  All right, not my best.  It was just a general attempt to make a Belgian-y quasi-wit.
Homebrewing is all about enjoying beer.

As you can see Witless is considerably darker than many wits.  It has grown even darker as it’s aged, transforming from orange/brown to copper/brown.

You may have surmised from an earlier post that I am not overly fond of hops.  Thus, unsurprisingly their aroma cannot be found in my beer.  A tart bready smell is there.

It has more apple than citrus.  The house got a little hot during ferment.  It was June in Arizona and I’m trying to save a little money.  It doesn’t taste bad, though.  It has some other fruit overtones that I can’t place.

It’s a little over 5% abv which isn’t too bad.  Witless is mine and I like it.  It grows a little sour and I don’t mind that at all.  Makes it more Belgian-y.